Out-Of-State Speeding Tickets

This article is intended for individuals who live in another state besides New York and have received a speeding or traffic ticket in New York State.
New York license holders who receive an out-of-state traffic ticket click here.

Out-of-State Drivers Who Receive New York Speeding Tickets

Getting a New York speeding ticket can be quite a hassle, especially when you are an out-of-state driver. Unfortunately, most out-of-state drivers never contest their NY speeding tickets. They think that it is too much of a hassle to drive back and argue. They usually justify their inaction by thinking that points will not transfer back to their home state. However, in many cases this is simply untrue.

Points Do Transfer

Despite what most people think, many states will assess points against your driving record for an out-of-state traffic violation.

For example, drivers from Florida, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Nebraska, South Carolina, Texas, and Virginia (just to name a few) will receive the full amount of points for out-of-state traffic violations as if they were committed right at home.

Similarly, New Jersey drivers will receive 2 points for every out-of-state traffic violation they receive (that is 2 per ticket). Likewise, California drivers will have 1 point assessed for minor violations and 2 points for major violations.

Additionally, many states will suspend your license if you are convicted of an out-of-state traffic offense that would have resulted in a suspension were it committed at home.

Why it Pays to Fight an Out-of-State Speeding Ticket

In most cases, if you hire an attorney to fight your out-of-state speeding ticket, you will not need to appear in court. In other words, if you receive a New York speeding ticket and are licensed to drive in another state, you will not have to drive back to New York if you hire an attorney to fight your ticket. Additionally, simply pleading guilty could be extremely dangerous. Most out-of-state drivers think they are only paying a fine, but they fail to realize that their insurance rates could go up dramatically.

Most states have entered into the Driver’s License Compact, so driving data is freely transferred from state to state. This means the Department of Motor Vehicle (DMV) will likely know about your out-of-state speeding ticket and your car insurance carrier will have access to this information too.

Furthermore, accruing 11 points or more in the State of New York—even as an out-of-state driver—will cause you to lose your ability to drive in New York (i.e. your right to drive in New York will be suspended). Remember, this accumulation of 11 points is based on the New York violations you commit under New York’s point system (not your state’s point system).

Imagine: While on a family vacation a police officer catches you flying down the Thruway at 41 miles over the posted speed limit (an 11 point offense). Getting convicted of this one offense will prevent you from driving in New York for quite a while.

Moreover, if you are convicted or plead guilty to a driving offense that would be 6 points in New York (e.g. driving 21-30 mph over the limit), you will be forced to pay a Driver Responsibility Assessment (DRA) to the State of New York. The DRA is $100 per year for 3 years and an additional $25 per year will be charged for each additional point over 6 you receive. This means 1 extra point will cost you $75 more (since the assessment lasts for 3 years).

At the end of the day, it pays to fight an out-of-state speeding ticket. After all, these hidden costs—which you may not even find out about until it is too late—far exceed the cost of hiring an experienced NY traffic ticket attorney to handle your case.

Who Should You Contact?

If you recently received a New York speeding ticket and you are an out-of-state driver, contact Adam H. Rosenblum of The Rosenblum Law Firm. Mr. Rosenblum has years of experience fighting traffic tickets, negotiating with prosecutors, and getting the results you are looking for. Call him today at 888-815-3649 .


347 thoughts on “Out-Of-State Speeding Tickets”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  1. Hi, I got a speeding ticket of 90 in a 55 a few days ago but pleaded not guilty and would like to fight it and was curious as to how much it would cost to get a lawyer from your firm and if they’d be able to knock down the points. Im from CT and this ticket is from Rye, NY.

    • Despina – you may contact us at 888-883-5529 to discuss our pricing structure. As you may be aware, you are facing an 8 point ticket that has substantial fines and penalties.

  2. I was informed by my home state (michigan) that I have a ticket on my record from New York and that until this is resolved I cannot renew my license. I have never been to New York…. what is my best course of action?

    • Joe – I suggest you contact the NY DMV to determine the details of the violation against you. If these violations have been committed by a 3rd party using your information, there are procedures in place to correct this.

  3. HELLO, I have been assessed in NYState for 11 mi. over limit. I paid fine, pleaded guilty (didn’t read your blog!) and now I have an assessment of 300. Is it too late to do anything? I am assuming the points will transfer to PA, although my insurance only went up about 100 for the year, and I thought it was a normal rate increase. Oh boy what to do?

    • Please provide more details, including the date of violation, the date you plead guilty, and what court has jurisdiction over your case.

  4. Hi,
    I have NJ licence and was returning from Buffalo NY got speeding ticket on I-360 (Town of Owego court) for 81mph on 65mph limit. Speed was detected by RADAR.
    If I Contest do I have to go to court in person? Will that help in points reduction? To spare me trip if I decide to pay ticket how many points I will get on my NJ license?
    pls reply.

    • Shruti – This is a 4 point ticket that will result in a fine of $393. 2 points transfer over to your NJ license if convicted of this offense. If you contest this case, you will likely need to appear.

  5. Hi,
    I got a speeding ticket in NY, caught at 74 on 55 mph near NY 219 toward buffalo.
    On the way my wife got sick and was restless,so I was just trying to reach safely, and I ws pulled Over.
    Will I be getting points on the IL License.Also recently I moved to a different state, In this case will what will happen if i apply for license in that state.

    • Ankit – As we are not licensed in IL, we can not provide advice as to their point system. However, generally speaking, violations transfer between the states, thus impacting insurance rates.

  6. Hi,

    If one holds an Ohio license and received a ticket for speaking on a cell phone. Will the points transfer to Ohio?

    Thank you

    • Aaron – while we can not advise you on the laws of OH, the violation itself will transfer to OH – generally resulting in increases to insurance rates.

    • Red – this violation will likely result in your son’s license being suspended. I therefore strongly urge you to consider contesting this violation.

  7. Hi, I am a NJ resident and I received a ticket in Ramapo, NY for going 61 in a 45. The speed was confirmed via laser. Do you know what the fines would be and the insurance increase? Is it worth the effort to fight this in court? Thank you

    • The fines for this 4 point ticket are $393, 2 points would transfer to NJ, and your insurance rates would likely increase by 20-25%.

  8. I have to appear in court on 11/29 for a ticket i got, keeping up with traffic but “i was in the fast lane” even though the other two drivers we ahead of me. What should I say? Just that?

    • ‘Going with the flow of traffic’ is not a defense to speeding – in fact, you are essentially admitting to the offense of speeding. Speeding is a strict liability offense, which means that there is no defense available. The only way to fight such a violation is to prove that the officer charging you was unable to meet their burden of proof. Finally please keep in mind, the precise procedures differ based on the location of the incident.

  9. I have a Kentucky driver’s license. I got a speeding ticket on I-90 in Pembroke, NY on 11/03/16 (1180D – 16mph over the limit). Does New York offer traffic school to keep the violation off my permanent record?

    • Violations do not ‘dissapear’ from your permanent record. NY will suspend your license if you accumulate 11 points in any 18 month period.

  10. Hi I Got speeding ticket in New York state and my drivers license is from South Carolina.
    i just came out of rest area and trying to merge with existing traffic and speed limit at that road is 65 and got ticket for 80 mph. i am sure i was not in 80 mph. could you please help me how can i respond to that ticket. i need to respond to that ticket by nov 28th

    Thanks,
    Sree

    • Sree – we can help you both respond to and contest this ticket. While we can not advise you on the point system of your state, violations generally transfer between the states – thus impacting insurance rates substantially.

  11. I have received a NY speeding ticket last week, the speed is +16 under 1180B section. I have received a ticket last year in October which was +19. How much would this impact my insurance and what should i be doing now?

    • Vicky – A second increase can cause a major hike in your insurance rates. This ticket carries 4 points and a $393 fine. There is also a Driver Responsibility Assessment fee imposed by the DMV whenever a driver receives 6 points or more within an 18 month period. If you plead guilty, you would have a total of 8 points on your record and a $450 DRA fee. You should fight this ticket to reduce the penalties and minimize your points.

  12. Hi I got a speeding ticket on 684 near Bedford Hills. I was clocked at 76 in a 65. Plus gave me a ticket for the things that go around your plate said they are giving me this instead of a non blinker when I transfered lanes. This was last December the court date is this December 6, 2016. Is there way I can get out of this. I live in Maine. The violation date was 12/26/2016.